Why "71º & Sunny?"

I consider 71º to be the perfect temperature. Not too cold and not too hot. I also love perfect sunny days. The vast majority of days are not 71º & Sunny and yet, all days were created by God's hand and they are still gifts, even if they don't fit my ridiculous definition of perfection. My struggle with OCD has at times imprisoned me in an impossible attempt to achieve perfection. I'm now learning to love all kinds of days that don't even come close to 71º & Sunny.

Please leave me a comment below. I really want to know what you are thinking!

Saturday, May 3, 2014

Am I OCD?

This morning, I was driving on the highway and listening to a local news radio station. I was pleased to hear the reporter talking about an upcoming NAMI Walk. It got me to thinking, though, when he referred to a woman, who was acting as a spokesperson for mental illness, by saying, "She is Bipolar."

She is Bipolar. That's like saying, "He is heart disease, or she is lung cancer." She is NOT Bipolar. She HAS Bipolar. I am not OCD, I have OCD. Even so, it's only a part of my life. It is not all of it. Just like whatever you struggle with is not all of you either.

13 comments:

  1. I hear you, Monique. She is bipolar, she is depression, she is autistic, she is retarded, etc., makes it like it is something that one is rather than one has.

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    1. Exactly, Linda! It may sound just like semantics, but I've discovered that the words we use (even just to ourselves) can have a profound effect on our thinking.

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    2. Effect, affect? It's confusing when to use each!

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  2. You're so right! Labels should not be attached like that to define someone. Ugh. That really annoys me.

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  3. Great point, Sunny. I wonder why we label people that way, how it got started?

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  4. Such an important post, Sunny, and this derogatory way of speaking needs to be brought to people's attention, over and over again, until everyone "gets it." Thanks for doing your part!

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    1. My pleasure, Janet! Thank you for all you do for the OCD community.

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  5. Thanks---I really needed to hear this today!!!

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  6. We might not say she is heart disease or he is lung cancer, but we do say he is diabetic or she is asthmatic...

    Similarly while we may not say a person is depression or is autism we can say the person is depressed or is autistic...some disorders have a more obvious adjective form vs. noun form and others don't...I don't think people mean it to be offensive when they say someone is OCD...perhaps my opinion is biased though since I am equally likely to say I am OCD vs. I have OCD (or since I also struggle socially I may just shorten it to I OCD and leave out the verb)

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    1. Oh I totally agree, va, that no offense is usually meant. And true, there are some other illnesses beside mental illness that use a somewhat similar type of phrasing. Although I can't pinpoint why, saying someone is diabetic versus saying someone is diabetes feels different to me, and I *think* that is what hits me weirdly. Perhaps I make too much of these things, but then it's kind of like ERP. In ERP, we have to do things to the opposite in order to get us comfortable with the "normal middle-of-the-road" stuff. Perhaps in mental health advocacy, we have to push further than we really should need to, just to get us to a good middle ground of less overall stigma?

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