Why "71º & Sunny?"

I consider 71º to be the perfect temperature. Not too cold and not too hot. I also love perfect sunny days. The vast majority of days are not 71º & Sunny and yet, all days were created by God's hand and they are still gifts, even if they don't fit my ridiculous definition of perfection. My struggle with OCD has at times imprisoned me in an impossible attempt to achieve perfection. I'm now learning to love all kinds of days that don't even come close to 71º & Sunny.

Please leave me a comment below. I really want to know what you are thinking!

Thursday, November 1, 2012

An Actual, Real-Life Sports Hero?

An actual, real-life sports hero? I think I may have just found one. In this era of doping, steroids, criminal behavior, and title stripping, it is refreshing to come upon an athlete who uses his newfound fame for something else other than his own personal enrichment. I recently came across an interesting article at CNN online that introduced me to a brave young man. Royce White, 21, is a basketball player who is commencing his rookie year for the Houston Rockets. Royce battles Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. And he's not shy about sharing that information.

One of Royce's biggest struggles is his extreme fear of plane flights. Of course, being part of a professional basketball team means constant flying. Ironically, this may actually help him to overcome his OCD. Those of us who've been through CBT/ERP know that consistent exposure to things that frighten us is the only real way to beat a fear. Going to work may be the best thing that ever happened to Mr. White!

Royce has used his experiences with anxiety to encourage others who struggle as well. As a college basketball player, he visited with a group of youngsters who also dealt with mental illness and he shared about his disorders with them. Additionally, he is working to end the stigma of mental illness through a new campaign that he is initiating.

Personally, I haven't been interested in the NBA since Larry Bird led the Celtics to greatness. Hmmm . . . I may just have to start watching a little basketball again.

12 comments:

  1. Thank you for telling us about Royce White. I followed your link, and I'm impressed too. That's great that he's open about talking about his issues and wants to help de-stigmatize mental illness.

    I was a big Larry Bird fan.

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    1. You're very welcome, Tina! I really have to hand it to him. He's in a very big spotlight and that would frighten a lot of people. He might have anxiety, but he's no scaredy-cat!

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    2. As a recent (although now former) NBA season ticket holder, I communicate online and in person with many NBA fans. Now while these people lean to the "accepting of differences" side of the spectrum, I've been surprised that most comments about him run to "Houston may have erred in selecting him in the draft due to his current inability to fly" but that people have been surprisingly open and kind regarding his anxiety issues. It's interesting and heartening.

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    3. Thanks for sharing that, Ann. I'm hoping that Royce will start CBT/ERP and then he can prove all those people wrong who think Houston may have made a mistake. Could you imagine, if he gets a top notch psychologist, and his OCD improves dramatically? He could talk about that and the word would really spread about the proper treatment. What a difference that could make to him personally and the OCD community.

      I am glad to hear though, that people have been compassionate about his anxiety.

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  2. Thank you for supplying the link on this athlete and sharing. Appreciate his honesty and his encouragement. Blessings.

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    1. I so appreciated his honesty too, JBR. I think it's really inspiring for all of us. Blessings to you too!

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  3. Thankyou :) I think that Ann's point is an interesting one - are people more accepting of things when they are faced with them? I don't know...maybe it's when they're shown that it's OK to be affected by mental illness, and it doesn't immediately mean you're going to murder someone or do something terrible???

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    1. Hmmm . . . you make an interesting point, Kate. I think it's true, people hear the word mental illness and their mind goes to all kinds of scary places. It's been my personal experience that most people with mental illness are not dangerous, they are just in agony.

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  4. What a wonderful role model this young man is. Thanks for sharing, Sunny!

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    1. My pleasure, Janet. Yes, he is a great role model!

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  5. It is so good to hear of someone who can truly be a positive role model-so refreshing. He can do such good work toward helping others especially children/young people who struggle in a similar way. Thank you for sharing this because we so often hear the negative but it is so heart affirming to hear this true story.

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    1. Oh, you are right - it was really nice to read something positive for a change. I especially liked that he took the time to talk to kids who struggle. Children need to know that their dreams can still come true in spite of their difficulties in life.

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